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DiabeticallyYours

Living life as a Type 1 Diabetic.

Archive for the category “Info”

The difference between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes.

Recently, I’ve been reminded that even though I am a type 1 diabetic, my upstairs neighbour (a type 2 diabetic) has a different treatment than I have. Before I was diabetic, I would not know the difference, heck, I thought that having diabetes meant not eating sugar or else you get sick, type of thing. People who are not surrounded by diabetics or are not diabetics themselves usually have a poor education about the disease and the different types. So I thought I would give a definition of the difference and a little experience of mine from recent things that happened to me.

As per medicalnewstoday.com:

Type 1 Diabetes

In Type 1 Diabetes, the person’s own body has destroyed the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. When your own body destroys good stuff in your body it has what is called anautoimmune disease. Diabetes Type 1 is known as an autoimmune disease. 

Quite simply – a person with Diabetes Type 1 does not produce insulin. In the majority of cases this type of diabetes appears before the patient is 40 years old. That is why this type of diabetes is also known as Juvenile Diabetes or Childhood Diabetes. Diabetes Type 1 onset can appear after the age of 40, but it is extremely rare. About 15 per cent of all diabetes patients have Type 1. 

People with Type 1 have to take insulin regularly in order to stay alive. 

Diabetes Type 1 is not preventable, it is in no way the result of a person’s lifestyle. Whether a person is fat, thin, fit or unfit, makes no difference to his or her risk of developing Type 1. In the case of Diabetes Type 2, much of its onset is the result of bodyweight, fitness and lifestyle. The vast majority of people who develop Type 1 are not overweight, and are otherwise healthy during onset. You cannot reverse or prevent Type 1 by doing lots of exercise or eating carefully. Quite simply, the Diabetes Type 1 patient has lost his/her beta cells. The beta cells are in the pancreas; they produce insulin.

Type 2 diabetes:

Person with Diabetes Type 2 has one of two problems, and sometimes both:

1. Not enough insulin is being produced.

2. The insulin is not working properly – this is known as  insulin resistance

The vast majority of patients who develop Type 2 did so because they were overweight and unfit, and had been overweight and unfit for some time. This type of diabetes tends to appear later on in life. However, there have been more and more cases of people in their 20s developing Type 2, but it is still relatively uncommon. 

Approximately 85% of all diabetes patients have Type 2. 

Recently, as some of you know, I’ve subscribed to Weight Watchers. As I’m part of a diabetes forum, I’ve asked them if they knew or know anyone who is diabetic and have any stories to share. I was surprised to realize that 90% of all comments were negative for all sorts of reason, but mostly because WW now counts fruits as 0 points. I was wondering how that was a problem until I realized that out of every replies, only 1 type1 diabetic had answered me. The rest were all type 2. Most of type 2 control their diabetes with medications and by watching what they eat, meaning as little sugars as they can get. Fruits have sugar. Good sugars, but sugar non the less. Or as we diabetics call them, carbs. The more you eat them, the more sugar you have in your blood stream.

That being said, as a type 1 diabetic wearing an insulin pump, if I want an apple, I will eat an apple. I log in 15g of carbs into my pump and she (Yes, my pump is female!) gives me the necessary amount of insulin to cover those carbs. Just as a regular pancreas would. But most type 2 diabetics don’t regulate their blood sugar with insulin. It is with medications, so they cannot eat fruit, or any other things that contain carbs, as they want.

It’s weird, I’ve been diabetic for 6 years, and it just dawned on me that I may have it easy. Well, easier, than a type 2.

What do you think? Am I just thinking this or is it fact?

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The effects of “healthy” fats in your bloodstream

(Edit from March 15th)

Someone sent me a comment about how ridiculous this video was. I trashed the comment because it was arrogant and lacked any kind of intelligent conversation or leads to humble replies. So instead, I leave it up to you to leave a (smart) comment as to what you think about that video. Is this a real doctor? Is he showing real facts? Let’s debate! (And by debating, I don’t mean demean everyone who thinks that guy might have a point there.)

(End of edit from March 15th)

I’ve stumbled upon this blog post by The Plant Eater. All I can say is WOW. I knew fats were nasty to you, but even extra Virgin olive oil has it’s nasty effects in your blood stream. An eye opener, for sure.

Insulin pumps: Silouhette VS Quick-Set infusion set

In my last post, I was talking about insulin pumps and different infusion sets and realized that not everyone was aware of the four kinds of sets available on the market. Having tried two of them, here’s my two cents:

Silouhette infusion set:

The Silouhette set is mostly axed for lean, active people as it offers the option of insertion angle. If you’re a skinny person, you will love this set as you can insert the catheter at an angle that would best suit you: Right between the skin layer and the muscle, as parallel as can be!

Here are the positive points of the set I’ve find:

  • Hides well under clothes;
  • Easy to detach for showering, swimming, etc;
  • Loved the option of inserting the catheter at 45 degrees or as close to skin as possible;
  • Can easily be inserted manually

There are always cons though:

  • Easy to rip off of you when you bump into things, remove clothes, etc;
  • Easily leaves scars for people with sensitive skin, like me!;
  • As I gained weight during my pregnancy, the more fat build up, the less effective my usual infusion sites became.

Quick-Set infusion set:

 

The quick-set infusion set is the most popular choice and is effective for all patients. It has a 90 degrees cannula which offers best insulin injection. When I gained weight during my pregnancy (A whooping 60 lbs!) This set would reach deeper into my skin for better insulin action and I stuck with it post pregnancy!

Positive points:

  • 90 degrees catheter allowing great insulin effectiveness;
  • Difficult to accidentally rip! (My 1 year old son grabbed it several times and pulled without success, HAH!);
  • Leaves little to no scars on sensitive skin;
  • Even if recommended to change every 3 days, I keep it on for a whole week and it still is effective on the 7th day;
  • Has a great locking system to prevent accidental detachment.

Negative stuff:

  • Easy to see under the clothes as it gives bigger relief;
  • Sensitive skin people might find the glue-on part itchy;
  • Hard to manually insert (Without insertion tool) as it is a 90 degrees insertion.

Have you tried any of the other sets? If so, would you recommend another? And what are your experiences with those mentioned?

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