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DiabeticallyYours

Living life as a Type 1 Diabetic.

Archive for the month “March, 2012”

Deliciousness! Refreshing and very low on carbs!

My Journey Through Thick and Thin

It’s a cold and rainy spring day, but this recipe made me think of a hot summer day…  Here’s to a little imagination 🙂

Marinated chunks of grilled chicken breast served over a bed of lettuce with feta, fresh diced tomatoes, cucumbers, green peppers, black olives, red onions, parsley and dill tossed in olive oil and fresh lemon juice.

A wonderful high protein, low fat, low carb, low point, gluten-free main dish salad!

Mediterranean Chicken Kebab Salad (Thanks to Gina at www.skinnytaste.com)

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Bleeding Cannula!?

I realize that I have to change my injection site every 3 days. Having no more health insurance covering them, I make them last as long as I can, sometimes up to 8 days. But doing this also increases the chances that the insulin will become less effective as the injection site becomes “overly used”.

Two days ago, I removed my site (Well, it almost removed itself the adhesive band wasn’t doing it’s job anymore!) and found out the reason why I was high most of the time.

Well then! I didn’t even see the blood going through nor did I feel the insulin coming out. Some of it was actually coming out of the site, hence why I was so high all the time. It happened to me before, but so rarely that I didn’t even remember to check the site when my BG started going up. I blamed it on hormones, but usually, when it’s -that- time of the month, I drop down, I don’t go up.

Well! New site, new beginnings! Next time I’ll check as soon as I have an abnormal reading!

Do you change your site every three days or do you extend it’s living time on you?

Finger or forearm blood tests?

While I was reading my iBGStar user guide, I was reminded that you could now use your forearm to do your blood glucose tests. To me, testing on my fingertips isn’t a big deal. I don’t find it hurts (anymore) and I’m wondering if doing the tests on my forearm would benefit me in any way. So I’m doing my own little research to find out what positive or negative points I could find in changing my method of testing my blood sugar.

I wish my insurance would cover the CGM (Continuous Glucose Monitor) but I can’t really afford the standard 50$ every 3 days. That way, I wouldn’t have to test so often during the day, just less as you still have to make sure the results are accurate. But that’s another issue.

Abbott Diabetes Care suggest that testing on the finger is reccommended when you think your blood sugar is low. So I’m guessing that finger tests are more accurate, but that’s just a theory. The only benefit to testing elsewhere on your body I’ve found while searching the net, was that it’s less painful. But other than that, I’m wondering if any other kinds of benefits could emerge by doing so.

Are you testing anywhere else than on your finger tips?

 

iBGStar Review

I’ve finally received my iBGStar from Sanofi Aventis! I say finally because Canada post -again- did not deliver to my door and instead sent it to the post office. I blame this on a lazy postman.

I was very excited to get it, so much that I’ve basically let aside my chores for the day. No store visit for this lady today! (Bananas will have to wait, Aaden… Sorry!)

I’ve made a review video about it which I will integrate into this post at the bottom of it. So if you don’t feel like reading, go watch the video!

First, while the animations are purely decorative and entertaining, I love seeing my iPhone telling me to put blood on the test strip and make a futuristic animation of my blood going into the device and being tested. Super cool! (I bet this will even make my non-diabetic friends jealous and they most likely will want to try it out too just for the heck of it!) It’s easy to set up; even though I read the instructions to make sure I didn’t do anything wrong, it would have been easy to just connect the iBGStar, as it was already charged, and start testing right away. I was high, I knew this, but I didn’t care about spoiling my device with my super sugary blood, so I tested right away, along with my old OneTouch meter, to see if the readings matched. And they did, so everything was set to go!

Here are some positive points about the iBGStar:

  • Small; about 1/6th of the size of your iPhone or iPod;
  • Free app; just download it straight to your iPhone or iPod;
  • Track your BG on charts; up to 90 days of tracking on one single chart, easy for your endo to read;
  • Statistics e-mail friendly; Your endo needs some results on charts? One single press of a button and it’s right on his desk(top);
  • Built-in user guide; no more downloads from websites after losing your user guide;
  • Syncs readings to your iPhone when connected if you have made a reading while disconnected;
  • Goes where your iPhone or iPod goes;
  • Charges alone or with your iPod and iPhone. Just connect to the wall or into your iPhone or iPod and your iBGStar charges!

And for some negatives:

  • iPhone and iPod battery vampirism; the iBGStar loves your device’s energy! Sucks it right out to charge itself, unless your device is on hibernating mode;
  • No customizable backgrounds; you have the choice of 6 pre made backgrounds to chose from.

So far, so good! I can’t see anything else that is a negative. So that was a small review, yes, but I’m sure I will have much more to say about the iBGStar in the next coming weeks as I get accustomed to my new toy.

;

Oh hi Active life!

And it’s packing day! And probably will be packing week as we’re moving in about 2 months! Packing, if done at my pace, is a pretty nice workout I’ve found. I’ve dropped low 2 times until I decided to put m pump at 50% of it’s usual basal rate. But then, I decided that I would work my elliptical machine while Aaden would nap (and is still napping. The only time I can blog without interruption!) so 20 minutes of intense “running”, I had to lower my basal rate at 25%. And still go low. I think I’m working too hard -or- need to lower it even more.

As for my blood sugar, it’s been dropping like a bullet. I am blaming this on weight loss and I’m not going to complain about it, HAH! I can fix a low very easily, however, it’s much harder to lose weight.

Speaking of blood sugar, I’m waiting for Canada postal service to deliver my new precious little baby; the iBGstar. Fellow blogger Diabuddies blogged about it and got me hooked. Next thing you know, I’m ordering the thing. Will be posting reviews about it soon so keep reading!

Until then, stay healthy!

Journey into weight loss: Weight-in #1

And here we are. One week later. One week of Weight Watchers point system. I was surprised how easy it would be to follow, maybe because I’m so used to tracking my blood sugar, I didn’t find it a chore to keep tracking points.

I walked a lot, I was more active than usual, and I made most of my food from scratch. Time consuming, but nothing I can’t handle. Even with Aaden needing my attention every 5 minutes!

I felt more… Awake. I felt like I had more energy all week long. Maybe because I’m motivated, maybe because of this lifestyle change, but even my friend noticed when she saw me yesterday. And most of the time, I can keep up with my little boy and play ”soccer” with him. (Mostly he’s just throwing the ball because kicking isn’t his forte yet!).

I’ve dreaded the scale for the longest time. So needless to say that when I hopped on I was expecting no change. A 216lbs. I was kind of expecting no change because I’m used to it I think. But deep down, I knew my active week had played on my weight. So. Tiptoed on the scale and waited for the numbers to show. 211. Two hundred and eleven. I dropped 5 lbs! Hey! No too shabby! I was thinking I’d lost 2 lbs at most, but 5 I can deal with! Let’s say I lose the same amount every week, in one month I will have lost 20lbs! I think I’ll make that my goal then! Keep focus and lose the same amount weekly, until the crazy plateau comes knocking at my door.

I like!

On top of that, My blood sugars have been amazing all week! Okay, the occasional spike occurred, but most of the time I was in the normal range! Hey, there’s another good reason to keep it up, right?

5 likes and dislikes about being a diabetic mom!

A fellow blogger suggested I make this post after the 5 likes and dislikes about being a mom. Great idea! And I’m sure other diabetic moms out there will be able to relate! If you’re diabetic and don’t have kids, here’s what you can be expecting later in life about being a mommy!

5 likes:

  1. Healthy lifestyle! Having a baby gave me a great reason to take (better) care of my diabetes. I need to be as healthy as I can to be there for him later in life!;
  2. Are you a couch potato? Not anymore! Running after your toddler will have your BG drop often! At least in -my- case…;
  3. Healthy foods! Watch those carbs, eat more vegetables! Before being diabetic, I would eat anything, really. And Probably would give Aaden a “HappyMeal” much more often. Now that I know what foods can actually do to him, because of what I’ve learned as a diabetic, Aaden has a healthy lifestyle!;
  4. Amazing snacks! Seriously. When I’m low, I tend to look for anything high in carbs. Now, I tend to grab snacks I buy for Aaden, which in turn are pretty delicious and healthier!;
  5. A reason -never- to give up. Sometimes, as most diabetics will feel, I get really bummed out. Angry at life for giving me this disease. Not getting up in the morning sounds like a great idea… But when you hear your child babbling in his crib in the morning, laugh with you during the day and fall asleep in your arms at night, you’ve truly have found a reason to never, ever give up.

5 dislikes:

  1. Hypoglycemias. On their own, they are manageable. With a screaming kid clamped to your leg, it’s extremely infuriating;
  2. Pump users, warning! Aaden thinks the transparent tube that sometimes is dangling out of my pants is an amazing toy and tends to yank on it often;
  3. Dangerous wandering test strips. Sometimes I don’t realize it but I’ve dropped a used test strip on the floor. Aaden likes to taste everything that’s on the floor. Yeah, you know where I’m going with that;
  4. The fear that he might become diabetic. Sure, anyone could become type 1 or type 2. But being diabetic, your child has even more chances. I really wish Aaden to stay healthy, always.
  5. Pregnancy. I hated my pregnancy. The whole thing. Gaining 62 lbs, having to take 50 units for breakfast instead of 6, constantly having to readjust my insulin intake because of continuously raging hormones… Not cool!

What about you? If your a diabetic mom, I’d love to hear your thoughts! If you’re not a mom yet, what are your fears and expectations?

Raspberries on the cheek!

Low carbs Twist on Cannelloni!

I’ve recently discovered that I can cook. With the right instructions and motivation, I can actually kick some butt in my kitchen. Now, people who don’t know me should know that I’ve never liked cooking in my entire life. The whole 30 years I’ve been on this planet, I have not found any passion for cooking, until now.

After I joined Weight Watchers, I started looking for recipes on the website. And that’s when I realized I was good at cooking and that I thrived on eating healthy, but most importantly, wanted to teach my son how to eat healthy.

Aaden loves pastas. The more spagetti on his plate, the better. So I started looking for alternative and found this amazing recipe! Behold on Beware, Weight Watchers’ Eggplant Rollatini with Tomato-Basil Sauce!

My cutting station is pretty small, but I got everything working!

I actually burnt my first batch... Make sure the eggplant slices are thick!

Out of the oven and ready to be devoured!

This recipe is Aaden Approved!

 

I wasn’t sure about the carbs since the WW system work on points, but I figured around 15 grams. My BG 2 hours after diner? 6.1! (109.8mg!) Is this one of my favourites now? Oh yes it is! And I will definitely make it again for my husband when he comes back!

The difference between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes.

Recently, I’ve been reminded that even though I am a type 1 diabetic, my upstairs neighbour (a type 2 diabetic) has a different treatment than I have. Before I was diabetic, I would not know the difference, heck, I thought that having diabetes meant not eating sugar or else you get sick, type of thing. People who are not surrounded by diabetics or are not diabetics themselves usually have a poor education about the disease and the different types. So I thought I would give a definition of the difference and a little experience of mine from recent things that happened to me.

As per medicalnewstoday.com:

Type 1 Diabetes

In Type 1 Diabetes, the person’s own body has destroyed the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. When your own body destroys good stuff in your body it has what is called anautoimmune disease. Diabetes Type 1 is known as an autoimmune disease. 

Quite simply – a person with Diabetes Type 1 does not produce insulin. In the majority of cases this type of diabetes appears before the patient is 40 years old. That is why this type of diabetes is also known as Juvenile Diabetes or Childhood Diabetes. Diabetes Type 1 onset can appear after the age of 40, but it is extremely rare. About 15 per cent of all diabetes patients have Type 1. 

People with Type 1 have to take insulin regularly in order to stay alive. 

Diabetes Type 1 is not preventable, it is in no way the result of a person’s lifestyle. Whether a person is fat, thin, fit or unfit, makes no difference to his or her risk of developing Type 1. In the case of Diabetes Type 2, much of its onset is the result of bodyweight, fitness and lifestyle. The vast majority of people who develop Type 1 are not overweight, and are otherwise healthy during onset. You cannot reverse or prevent Type 1 by doing lots of exercise or eating carefully. Quite simply, the Diabetes Type 1 patient has lost his/her beta cells. The beta cells are in the pancreas; they produce insulin.

Type 2 diabetes:

Person with Diabetes Type 2 has one of two problems, and sometimes both:

1. Not enough insulin is being produced.

2. The insulin is not working properly – this is known as  insulin resistance

The vast majority of patients who develop Type 2 did so because they were overweight and unfit, and had been overweight and unfit for some time. This type of diabetes tends to appear later on in life. However, there have been more and more cases of people in their 20s developing Type 2, but it is still relatively uncommon. 

Approximately 85% of all diabetes patients have Type 2. 

Recently, as some of you know, I’ve subscribed to Weight Watchers. As I’m part of a diabetes forum, I’ve asked them if they knew or know anyone who is diabetic and have any stories to share. I was surprised to realize that 90% of all comments were negative for all sorts of reason, but mostly because WW now counts fruits as 0 points. I was wondering how that was a problem until I realized that out of every replies, only 1 type1 diabetic had answered me. The rest were all type 2. Most of type 2 control their diabetes with medications and by watching what they eat, meaning as little sugars as they can get. Fruits have sugar. Good sugars, but sugar non the less. Or as we diabetics call them, carbs. The more you eat them, the more sugar you have in your blood stream.

That being said, as a type 1 diabetic wearing an insulin pump, if I want an apple, I will eat an apple. I log in 15g of carbs into my pump and she (Yes, my pump is female!) gives me the necessary amount of insulin to cover those carbs. Just as a regular pancreas would. But most type 2 diabetics don’t regulate their blood sugar with insulin. It is with medications, so they cannot eat fruit, or any other things that contain carbs, as they want.

It’s weird, I’ve been diabetic for 6 years, and it just dawned on me that I may have it easy. Well, easier, than a type 2.

What do you think? Am I just thinking this or is it fact?

Please help out fellow blogger! Reblogging it is essential! Thanks guys!

diabuddies

Hey friends, followers, and family!

I am walking with my dad and Nick on Saturday April 14th in the JDRF diabetes walk in Cocoa Beach Florida. I am helping to raise money to fund their diabetes research. The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation is the largest international organization that funds research exclusively for Type 1 diabetes. 100% of the money I raise will go to the JDRF. If you would like to donate, please visit my personal page and click on the “donate now” link. I have a very small goal of $200, but have only raised $25 so far. Please help out the JDRF!

http://www2.jdrf.org/goto/divabetic913

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